Airlift, experiences part of Fiji’s strategy to lure U.S. visitors

By
|

New name, new planes

It wouldn’t be an exaggeration to call changes at Air Pacific, now renamed Fiji Airways, an extreme makeover.

It goes beyond the name. The South Pacific carrier is transforming itself through the phased introduction of new A330 aircraft, a completely redesigned livery and increased service frequencies.

The carrier has taken delivery of two A330s and will get a third in November, which enables it to replace two aging 747s and step up the frequency of Los Angeles-Nadi service.

The fresh-from-the-Airbus factory A330 I boarded during a May “delivery service event” featured 24 ergonomically designed business-class seats that convert to a full-flat position, seatback 15.4-inch Panasonic LCD screens and practical storage.

In the back, seats in the two-four-two configuration provided a 32-inch pitch and individual touch-screen seatback LCD screens with on-demand entertainment.

For the livery design, the airline engaged local artist Makereta Matemosi to craft the carrier’s new identity using traditional Masi motifs that evoke Fijian cultural touchstones.

— David Yeskel

Fiji, an 11-hour flight from Los Angeles, has taken steps meant to kick-start tourism from the U.S. beginning this summer.

Until this year, the shortage of airlift, coupled with limited funding for Tourism Fiji, has inhibited efforts to promote U.S. leisure travel to the tropical archipelago.

However, increased flight frequencies and a boost in marketing and infrastructure resources for things like road improvements are expected to change that equation.

In addition, Fiji Airways, flying new A330s, will increase its Los Angeles-Nadi frequency from four weekly flights to daily service this fall. The carrier will add an eighth flight per week during some holiday periods.

To date, Australia and New Zealand have been the primary source markets for Fijian tourism, with North Americans a distant third in terms of arrivals.

Most of the large EP hotels that cater heavily to the Aussies and Kiwis are located in and around Nadi, close to the airport on the main island of Viti Levu.

However, a more authentic Fijian experience is found on the outer islands, specifically the Mamanucas and Yasawas. Affordable ferry service and relatively expensive flights from Nadi serve both island chains.

When Fiji Airways took delivery of its second new A330, I participated in the inaugural flight, which provided an opportunity to experience Fijian culture firsthand.

My stay at the Yasawa Island Resort & Spa, reached via a 35-minute flight from Nadi, was emblematic of the out-island experience. The resort’s 18 beachfront bungalows deliver rustic luxury, while doting staff quickly learn guest names and preferences.

The property’s two-to-one staff-to-guest ratio enabled daily boat excursions to the island’s far reaches for cave swims, scuba diving, village visits and private beach picnics.

Daily rates, inclusive of meals and nonscuba activities, start at $900 per room, double.

This isn’t a foodie destination, but upscale clientele are attracted to Yasawa Island’s only resort for its seclusion, romance and serenity. It’s an escape from civilization, with no cars, TV or noise — except for the soothing sounds of trade winds rustling the palms and the gentle lapping of the surf.

A pre- or post-Yasawa stopover in a Nadi-area hotel offers a different kind of experience. For our group, that was the Sigatoka River Safari, meaning a speedboat ride up the scenic Sigatoka River, where we caught glimpses of villagers who live and work along its banks.
Fiji-KavaCeremony-DY
At a considerably slower pace, we later visited a riverfront village, participated in a ritual kava ceremony, which involved drinking the narcotic kava root, crushed and mixed with water, and were treated to lunch prepared by village women.

Although other South Pacific destinations can boast spectacular scenery and beautiful beaches, Fiji emphasizes hospitality. “Our differentiator is our people,” said Elizabeth Powell, permanent secretary for tourism.

Comments

From Our Partners

Crystal Cruises – What’s Next, 2020 & the 30th Anniversary Collection
Crystal Cruises – What’s Next, 2020 & the 30th Anniversary Collection
Watch Now
HAL_AlaskaCruising_Hero
Capitalizing on a Peak Year for Alaska Cruising
Read More
2020 Elite Island Webinar
More Family Fun in St. Lucia @ St. James’s Club Morgan Bay
Register Now

JDS Travel News JDS Viewpoints JDS Africa/MI