A study done for CLIA shows that significant cruise incidents did not grow during the period between 2009 and 2013, despite an 18% increase in cruise ship capacity.

The study, done by consultant GP Wild, said an average of 20.4 incidents a year took place over the five years examined. The number of incidents was highest in 2010, at 27, and lowest in 2011, at 15.

Last year, there were 21 incidents categorized as significant, meaning that there was loss of life, serious injury, or a ship suffered more than a 24-hour delay in its published schedule.

The study found a decline in the number of minor incidents reported during the five-year time frame, as well as a decline in the number of missing-person incidents.

It also measured cruises against other forms of transportation and found cruising had by far the lowest fatality rate of any form of transportation, even accounting for the Costa Concordia accident in 2012. It found that from 2011 to 2013 there were 28 fatalities associated with cruise lines and 970 associated with world airlines.

“During this time of rapid growth in passenger volume, cruise ships not only maintained their exceptional safety record, but were also shown to be safer than most other forms of travel,” Peter Wild, managing director of GP Wild said in a statement.

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