Arts Agenda: Museum invites Bruce fans to relive glory days

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Exhibitions throughout the U.S. focus on American visual and performing artists, from the 19th century to modern times. Overseas, famed music festivals, both classical and jazz, make their annual appearances.

Domestic

Atlanta -- Hale Woodruff in Atlanta, at the High Museum of Art through Sept. 26, shows works created by the African-American artist during the decade he lived in the Georgia city.

Beacon, N.Y. -- In a little over a year, Dia: Beacon Riggio Galleries, in a small town on the Hudson River, has established itself as a key place to see art from the 60s to the present. Housed in a 300,000-square-foot former factory, the museum mounted its first in a series of temporary exhibitions with Going Forward Into Unknown Territories. The exhibition of 1957 to 1967 paintings by Agnes Martin continues through April 18.

Chicago -- One of the worlds most famous works of art becomes the centerpiece of an exhibition at the museum it calls home, the Art Institute of Chicago. Through Sept. 19, Seurat and the Making of La Grande Jatte looks at the evolution of the work and its impact. The 130-piece show includes 40 works by Seurat related to his masterpiece, reframed and reglazed for the exhibition.

Cooperstown, N.Y. -- Watercolors, oils and wood engravings by a noted 19th century American painter are featured in the Fenimore Art Museum exhibition running through Sept. 6, Winslow Homer: Masterworks from the Adirondacks.

The nearby Glimmerglass Opera features several performances through Aug. 22 of the U.S. premiere of The Mines of Sulphur, an opera with a mystery theme that won plaudits in its European performances.

Katonah, N.Y. -- Richard Diebenkorn Prints 1948-1993 at the Katonah Museum of Art through Oct. 3 marks the first retrospective of the American artists prints.

Minneapolis -- The Minnesota Fringe Festival, billed as the U.S.s largest festival of its kind, takes over the city from Aug. 6 to 15 with more than 150 shows in 20 different venues.

Newark -- The Boss holds center stage at the Newark Museum, where a multimedia exhibit devoted to the career of Bruce Springsteen runs through Aug. 28. Troubadour of the Highway focuses on the singers use of cars as a theme and includes photos, memorabilia, videos and lyrics.

Newport, R.I. -- Its the 50th anniversary season for this citys famed JVC Jazz Festival, which runs Aug. 11 to 15 with an all-star lineup that includes Dave Brubeck, Herbie Hancock, Harry Connick Jr., Dianne Reeves, Ornette Coleman and the Lincoln Center Jazz Orchestra (led by Wynton Marsalis).

New York -- Some 200 works by a noted contemporary American artist are featured in Cotton Puffs, Q-Tips, Smoke and Mirrors: The Drawings of Ed Ruscha, which runs at the Whitney Museum of American Art along with a companion exhibit, Ed Ruscha and Photography, through Sept. 26.

Following extensive renovations, the Noguchi Museum in Queens has reopened. In addition to its permanent collection and outdoor sculpture garden devoted to the work of the innovative artist, the museums first temporary exhibition, Isamu Noguchi: Sculptural Design, is on display through Oct. 3.

A perfect segue into this summers national political conventions is an exhibit at the New-York Historical Society titled If Elected: Campaigning for the Presidency. On display through Nov. 28, the exhibit looks at the history of presidential elections from George Washingtons days until the present. Included are scores of campaign items, among them buttons, bandanas, banners, lanterns and slogans ranging from Tippecanoe and Tyler Too to Keep Cool-idge.

The American Museum of Natural Historys Frogs: A Chorus of Colors, through Oct. 3, uses more than 200 live frogs to explore their evolution and biology.

Philadelphia -- What has been termed the last great decade of country music is the focus of the Print Centers exhibition running through Aug. 21. Honky Tonk: Portraits of Country Music 1972-1981, Photographs by Henry Horenstein, includes photos of celebrities Minnie Pearl, Hank Williams Jr., Loretta Lynn and Dolly Parton.

Rochester, N.Y. -- Youll be jamming at a jazz club and conducting the Boston Pops at Making American Music: Rhythm, Roots & Rhyme, an interactive exhibition running through Sept. 12 at the Strong Museum.

Seattle -- A Dutch collection of modern art, Van Gogh to Mondrian: Modern Art From the Kroller-Muller Museum, is on display at the Seattle Art Museum through Sept. 12, before traveling to Atlantas High Museum of Art for an Oct. 19 opening.

Washington -- The Folger Shakespeare Library draws on its expansive collection of 16th and 17th century manuscripts and works of art for its exhibition, Voices of Tolerance in an Age of Persecution. Running through Oct. 30, the show explores individuals and communities that responded to hate and intolerance in early modern Europe.

The National Gallery of Art features Palace and Mosque: Islamic Art From the Victoria and Albert Museum through Feb. 6.

International

Bayreuth, Germany -- The sound of opera rings loud and clear at one of the worlds top music events. The annual Richard Wagner Music Festival takes center stage through Aug. 28. 

Cologne, Germany -- The Cologne Ringfest, Aug. 13 to 15, is free. Featuring virtually every kind of music, the open-air festival draws 2 million visitors a year.

Roque dAntheron, France -- The keyboards the thing at the 24th annual Roque dAntheron International Piano Festival through Aug. 24. The festival in Provence features more than 75 artists performing everything from baroque to jazz.

Salzburg, Austria -- Austria pays homage to Mozart and other composers at the Salzburg Festival 2004, through Aug. 31.

Long-time arts and tourism writer Alvin H. Reiss is editor of the Travel Arts Partnership Newsletter (TAP), which is published by Museums Magazine, the Arts & Business Council and the Art Knowledge Corp. For more details, visit www.travelartspartnership.com.

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