ear Subscriber: Elbi's "Law of Industrial Semantics" states that as an industry grows, it develops a specialized language. The travel industry is no exception. Like all languages, the jargon of travel evolves over time, as words and concepts take on new shades of meaning. As a public service, we have compiled the following list as an appendix to your industry dictionary. Please print and save. It contains new definitions for key words and phrases, updated in light of recent industry events.

ARTA. A group of travel agents who agree among themselves to disagree with everybody else.

ASTA. A group of travel agents that has 6,000 membership categories, 6,000 members and 6,000 elected officials.

CLIA. An entity that includes most cruise lines.

Carnival Corp. An entity that includes most cruise lines.

Consortium. A group of travel agents whose membership list is equal to its preferred-supplier list.

Destination specialist. You watched a video.

Direct Link. This is when the travel agency calls the airline for availability and fare information, using a computer instead of a telephone. (See GDS.)

Dynamic packaging. This is when you put together a package using a mouse.

EveryFare. A big success.

FWOFL. Former Web-only Fare Level, pronounced "F-waffle," in recognition that the airlines, previously adamant that the fares are "Web-only," now are flip-flopping and putting them in Sabre.

GDS. This is when the travel agency calls the airline for availability and fare information, using a computer instead of a telephone. (See Direct Link.)

Level playing field. This is where you compete. Key accounts also get a level playing field. But it's shorter.

Merchant Model. You don't get a commission, so you add a markup. (See Travel Agent Model.)

More Room. What some people get when an airline takes out some seats, and then puts some of them back.

Omission. What a hotel does to a travel agent's commission by charging the agent a fee for the payment thereof.

Orbitz. Five airlines agreeing not to violate the antitrust laws.

Pod. A device for disabling cruise ships.

Rental car. A conveyance for delivering tax revenue to state and local governments.

RevPAR. This could have something to do with golf carts. We're not sure.

Swiss. An airline strategy with holes in it.

Travel Agent Model. You don't get a commission, so you add a fee. (See Merchant Model.)

Web-only. A fare that is available in certain places, only one of which is the Web.

Visa. What the U.S. government requires you to have to go from one end of the airport to the other.

Void window. A window with bars on it.

Zero. The going rate.

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