Las Vegas' Monte Carlo Resort and Casino is approaching the completion of its transition to what will be known as the Park MGM, as owner MGM Resorts International looks to complement the open-air entertainment-retail enclave known as the Park.

Eschewing the traditional casino look of a marble lobby or wall and floor patterns in the guestrooms, the property's renovated lobby has shades of green and other lighter hues as well as an art piece of intertwined tree branches on the ceiling.

Room touches include window seats, a hodgepodge of artwork and a palette of contrasting whites, reds and greens.

In addition to the room renovations, the hotel has added the French-cuisine restaurant Primrose and Bavette's Steakhouse & Bar, and will add an outpost of the food marketplace Eataly by the end of next year. MGM Resorts, which says Park MGM's room rates will be comparable to those of the Mirage, will announce more food and beverage additions in January.

Meanwhile, MGM is redeveloping a 290-room section on the upper floors of the 3,000-room hotel under the NoMad luxury brand headed by New York-based Sydell Group. The NoMad Las Vegas will be completed by next fall.

In all, MGM is putting about $450 million into the Monte Carlo property, which opened on the Las Vegas Strip in 1996.

"The investment in the property is tremendous," said Patrick Miller, president and chief operating officer of the Monte Carlo. "The guest is really seeing what the vision of Park MGM really is."

Transformation in progress

The renovation as part of a broader effort by MGM to transform a western stretch of the Strip between the Monte Carlo and the New York-New York Hotel and Casino.

In 2016, MGM opened the Park, complete with art installations, shade structures and restaurants such as California Pizza Kitchen and Shake Shack as well as the 20,000-seat T-Mobile Arena.

Also in 2016, MGM opened the 5,300-seat Park Theater at the Monte Carlo site. The hotel-casino operator announced earlier this month that Lady Gaga will begin a two-year engagement at the property's Park Theater starting in December 2018.

With the NoMad, the company will also add to the Strip's inventory of "hotels within hotels."

In 2013, Caesars Entertainment opened the first Nobu Hotel, which was named for celebrity chef Nobu Matsuhisa, within Caesars Palace. The following year, MGM Resorts opened a 1,100-room hotel under the Delano brand within the Mandalay Bay Resort and Casino.

Such upgrades and hotels-within-hotels concepts reflect how Las Vegas operators are looking to cater to a higher-end guest looking for a more well-rounded experience in which culinary and entertainment options are at least as important as gaming choices, according to Mehmet Erdem, an associate professor at the University of Nevada-Las Vegas' William F. Harrah College of Hospitality.

"They want you to come for the concert, get dinner and then go to the casino floor and drop some change," said Erdem. "The market for people coming just to gamble is still there, but it's shrinking."

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