TWA name to endure on JFK hotel

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The TWA terminal, which opened in 1962 and closed in 2001, was designed by Finnish architect Eero Saarinen.
The TWA terminal, which opened in 1962 and closed in 2001, was designed by Finnish architect Eero Saarinen.

The old TWA terminal at New York’s John F. Kennedy International Airport will retain the name of the defunct carrier when it is redeveloped into a 505-room hotel.

The TWA Hotel, which is being built by New York-based MCR Development (JetBlue Airways has a 5% stake in the project), will cost about $265 million. MCR anticipates an opening by the end of 2018.

The project will include the restoration of the 54-year-old terminal into a public space that will include as many as eight restaurants and bars as well as the addition of two buildings set back from the original structure.

Other amenities will include 50,000 square feet of meeting space, a 10,000-square-foot observation deck and an old Lockheed Constellation plane parked outside.

MCR announced the project last year after reaching an agreement for a 75-year lease with the Port Authority of New York & New Jersey. The project is next to JFK’s Terminal 5.

The TWA terminal was designed by Finnish architect Eero Saarinen, whose other projects included the St. Louis Gateway Arch and Washington Dulles International Airport’s main terminal. The terminal opened at what was then called Idlewild Airport in 1962, the year after Saarinen’s death.

The terminal shut down in 2001, the year TWA was acquired by American Airlines. The building was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 2005.

MCR has either bought or developed 91 hotels, including Manhattan’s High Line Hotel.

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