Honolulu museum exhibit explores Hawaii's patterns

|
This decorated Hawaiian kapa (barkcloth) skirt is part of a new exhibit at Honolulu's Bishop Museum, "Hulia ‘Ano: Inspired Patterns."
This decorated Hawaiian kapa (barkcloth) skirt is part of a new exhibit at Honolulu's Bishop Museum, "Hulia ‘Ano: Inspired Patterns." Photo Credit: Courtesy of Bishop Museum

A new exhibit at the Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum in Honolulu illuminates the patterns found in Hawaiian art and how they reflect patterns found in nature.

 "Hulia Ano: Inspired Patterns" opened March 18 and runs through October 16. Visual patterns in an array of mediums are examined, including cloths, wood, and metal, and related to patterns found in Hawaii's landscape, flora, and fauna. Items on display include printed gourds, a royal feathered helmet known as a "mahiole," and bamboo stamps.

In a break from typical museum organization that places pieces together based on artist, era, function or material, the displays are organized based on their design motif. Each display is marked by a different Hawaiian word and its many definitions.

The exhibit will also feature interactive stations, and brand new pieces created by contemporary artists specifically for the Hulia Ano exhibit. At 1 p.m. Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays, visitors can test their skills at traditional Hawaiian printing. At one station, museum guests can decorate digital gourds by selecting and positioning patterns on a touch-screen computer. At the other, you can arrange icons from historic quilts, such as crowns, pineapples and flowers, to make patterns that are projected onto a wall as full-size quilts.

Bishop Museum partnered with five contemporary artists who represent a range of Hawaiian cultural backgrounds. Each of the artists visited Bishop Museum's collections to get inspiration for new works they created for the Hulia 'Ano exhibit.

Bishop Museum is open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily.

 

Comments
JDS Travel News JDS Viewpoints JDS Africa/MI