Holland America bestows Rotterdam name on its upcoming ship

|
A rendering of the Rotterdam VII, the latest in Holland America Line's Pinnacle class.
A rendering of the Rotterdam VII, the latest in Holland America Line's Pinnacle class. Photo Credit: Holland America Line

Holland America Line will change the name of it next newbuild from the Ryndam to the Rotterdam, making it the seventh ship in Holland America's nearly 150-year history to bear the name.

The 2,668-passenger Rotterdam is scheduled for delivery on July 30, pushed back from its original May 2021 delivery due to the pandemic. The third ship in the Pinnacle-class series, it is scheduled to spend its first summer on Northern Europe and the Baltic cruises from Amsterdam.

The Rotterdam name holds a lot of significance for the line.

"The first ship for Holland America Line was the original Rotterdam, the company was headquartered in the city of Rotterdam for many years, and the name has been a hallmark throughout our history since 1872, so clearly the name is powerful and symbolic," Gus Antorcha, Holland America's president, said in a statement.

"With the current Rotterdam leaving the company, we knew we had a unique opportunity to embrace the name as our new flagship and carry on the tradition of having a Rotterdam in our fleet," he added. "Seven is a lucky number, and we know she's going to bring a lot of joy to our guests as she travels across the globe."

Holland America said that the first Rotterdam sailed its maiden voyage from the Netherlands to New York Oct. 15, 1872, and led to the founding of the company in April 1873. The Rotterdam II was built in 1878 for British Ship Owners Co. and purchased by Holland America Line in 1886. The Rotterdam III came in 1897, and the fourth Rotterdam joined the fleet in 1908, also serving as a troop carrier when World War I ended. Following the war, it made regular cruises from New York to the Mediterranean.

The Rotterdam V, which was the line's flagship for many years. It left the fleet in 1997.
The Rotterdam V, which was the line's flagship for many years. It left the fleet in 1997.

The Rotterdam V, also known as "The Grande Dame," set sail in 1959 and began sailing transatlantic crossings with two classes of service. It converted to a one-class ship in 1969 and sailed with Holland America for 38 years until 1997. It is currently a hotel and museum in the city of Rotterdam.

The Rotterdam VI, the most recent to cruise for Holland America Line, was introduced in 1997 and was the first ship in the line's R Class. It was purchased this summer by U.K.-based Fred. Olsen Cruise Line which will rename it the Borealis. The vessel was among four ships sold off from the Holland America fleet, leaving the line with 10 ships, part of a broader plan by parent company Carnival Corp. to reduce tonnage during the pandemic.   

The next Rotterdam will have the 270-degree surround screen World Stage, Rudi's Sel de Mer and Grand Dutch Cafe and will feature performances each night from its Lincoln Center Stage, B.B. King's Blues Club, Rolling Stone Rock Room and Billboard Onboard.

Comments

From Our Partners

2019 Riviera River Cruises Webinar
Riviera River Cruises – Summer Surprises
Register Now
Uganda_Hero
Uganda
Read More
2020 Uganda Webinar 2
Uganda’s Vast Horizons Await
Watch Now

JDS Travel News JDS Viewpoints JDS Africa/MI