The websites of major companies in the travel industry do not provide users with adequate protection from hackers, according to an analysis by the digital security company Dashlane.

"Big names in the travel industry often come under fire for their physical treatment of customers, receiving public blowback on social media for flight delays, egregious treatment of passengers, or even food-borne illnesses," Dashlane CEO Emmanuel Schalit said in a statement. "In many cases the result is a close examination of business practices and positive shift. The travel industry should treat their cybersecurity failings in much the same fashion, and make the necessary changes."

In its first Travel Website Password Power Rankings, Dashlane evaluated 55 of the most popular travel-related websites to see how many of five key password-security measures they took.

Dashlane checked to see if websites required passwords to be eight characters or more; if they prevented passwords from being created with either all numbers or all letters; if they offered a password-strength assessment tool; if they sent a user activation email after an account was created; and if they required two-factor authentication -- such as a password complemented by a specific USB stick. 

Websites that employed at least four of those measures were awarded a passing grade.

Using that methodology, Dashlane gave failing grades to 89% of the travel industry websites it analyzed. Just six passed.

Leading the way was Airbnb, which was the only company to score a perfect five for five. Hawaiian Airlines, Hilton, Marriott, Royal Caribbean and United each passed the Dashlane test with scores of four out of five.

Bringing up the rear was Norwegian Cruise Line, which Dashalne says does not provide adequate password security in any of the five criteria. Fifteen websites scored just one of out five in the analysis, among them American Airlines, Carnival, Trip Advisor and Trivago.

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